Stories and photos of my Life in the South West

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The Many Varieties of Wildflowers

I don't know the scientific name to the flowers that I am going to show you and it's silly me knowing it as I can't pronounce it when I'm told. So I'll tell you the names I've been told by my Mother and Father and different people from the bush. The photo above  is called the Potato flower or Potato bush and I don't believe the Botanical Gardens could produce a prettier flower.

These flowers I'm going to show you all grow in our Jarrah Forest. The above two photos are of Spider Orchids and I remember when I was six or seven years old one of my mothers sisters Aunty Marj and her daughter Betty, who was the same age as myself, also my young sister Phyllis. We would go for walks in the bush which was only 3 or 400 yrds from our house. We would pick a handful each, in very little time.

Then when I was married, my wife and our children, would do the same with my mother,  sister and her children. Also my mother is 92 and remembers doing the same with her mother in the same bush. Mum would always say you watch out for snakes. This was in September-October and the weather would be warming up as summer was just starting and the snakes were coming out from hibernation. This photo shows the Kangaroo Paw and I can remember times, hunting in the Jarrah forest with my father as a boy and walking onto Kangaroo Paws that were so thick you couldn't count them.

The photos below shows you a close up of the Snail Orchid and the conditions they thrive in, a burnt out Jarrah log.

 

 

Flowers Contd

Another one of natures masterpieces the Fringed Lily. The leaves and the nuts that surround it will become fertilizer when nature decides to burn it, with lightning strikes and she prefers to burn in the hottest month in summer, February or there abouts and the germination rate is at it's best. The next photo is a triple Fringed Lily. The following photo is another species of the Fringed Lily by the looks. Maybe the flower lovers out there can verify that. You could let me know with a comment in the  guest book. Maybe some-one out there can identify this one too. It grows on the top of the big gravel or iron-stone hills and flowers in November.

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